Funded Measures

Free Oil Boilers

Boiler grants are being allocated throughout the UK, available to many home owners and tenants in England, Scotland and Wales, as part of the 2017 Government funded energy efficiency scheme. In qualifying households, energy suppliers will install a free replacement, energy efficient boiler. The energy suppliers that install the boilers will depend on the location and type of property but the householder does not need to be an existing customer as their obligation extends to all UK households.

The scheme provides Government funding for energy-efficient, condensing boilers, which reduce carbon emissions and can save around £300 per year on your fuel bills. This is part of the Home Heating Cost Reduction Obligation (HHCRO) scheme or "Affordable Warmth" which is aimed at addressing fuel poverty in across the UK.

The boilers have an efficiency rating of A which will heat your property and hot water using less fuel, thus reducing your home energy costs.

The easiest way to see if you or your household qualifies is to complete the short application form and an assessor will advise you of the current grants available to you. They will also keep your details on file and advise of any future measures you will qualify for.

Find out if you qualify 

 

Free Air Source Heat Pumps

The scheme provides Government funding for energy-efficient, Air Sauce Heat Pumps, which reduce carbon emissions and can save around £500 per year on your fuel bills. This is part of the Home Affordable Warmth which is aimed at addressing fuel poverty in across the UK.

Air source heat pumps absorb heat from the outside air. This heat can then be used to heat radiators, under floor heating systems, or warm air convectors and hot water in your home.

An air source heat pump extracts heat from the outside air in the same way that a fridge extracts heat from its inside. It can get heat from the air even when the temperature is as low as -15° C. Heat pumps have some impact on the environment as they need electricity to run, but the heat they extract from the ground, air, or water is constantly being renewed naturally.

Find out if you qualify

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Free Loft Insulation

Saving Energy Group Loft InsulationIn an uninsulated home, about a quarter of heat generated will rise and be lost through the roof. Insulating the roof and loft space of your home is the simplest, most cost-effective way of saving energy and reducing your heating bills. Insulation should be applied to the loft area to a depth of at least 270mm, both between the joists and above as the joists themselves create a "heat bridge" and transfer heat to the air above. With modern insulating materials and techniques, it is still possible to use the space as a habitable space or for storage by using insulated floor panels. On an average detached house in the UK, an annual saving of £500 could be achieved.

When installing loft insulation, professional installation is a must.

If your loft is insufficiently insulated, you are likely to be losing a third of your heating costs through your roof. You can save wasted energy and money simply by insulating your loft to the recommended depth of 270mm. A standard loft insulation installation comprises not only of the fitting of the loft insulation, but also the bringing up to Building Regulations standards, the lagging to the cold water tanks and the pipes at no additional cost. This means that there is no possibility of any pipes or tanks bursting during cold weather and the job is well done. Your loft hatch will also be draught proofed and insulated where possible.

Find out if you qualify 

 


 

Free Cavity Wall Insulation

Saving Energy Group Cavity Wall InsulationAbout 35% of all heat loss from UK homes takes place through external walls. Most homes built after 1920 have twin exterior walls with a narrow cavity between them. This can be filled by injecting insulating materials such as foam or beads into the wall. This reduces the heat passing between them, reducing the money you spend on heating.

If you're unsure whether your walls have a cavity in them you can usually check by either looking at the pattern of bricks or by measuring the thickness of the walls next to a door or window: If the thickness of the wall is 260mm or greater, the wall probably has a cavity. If the brickwork is exposed, look at the brick pattern. If the bricks are all oblong, laid end-to-end then the wall is likely to have a cavity. The wall is likely to be solid if some of the bricks are laid with the square end facing or if the wall is stone.

On an average detached house in the UK, an annual saving of £500 could be achieved.

With cavity wall insulation, professional installation is a must.

Uninsulated cavity walls lose a third or more of the heat generated within the property. So for an uninsulated house that’s £1 of heat escaping for every £3 spent heating it. If your house was built after 1930 then your property will probably have cavity walls which may need insulating. It requires specialist, well maintained equipment costing several thousands of pounds to inject the insulation material - generally blown fibre - into the cavity effectively. With the right equipment, handled by experienced installers, the whole process should take between 2-3 hours depending on the size of the property.

Find out if you qualify 

 


 

Free Room in Roof Insulation

Saving Energy Group Room in Roof InsulationRoom In Roof Insulation grants are now being offered as part of the government's new Energy Companies Obligation scheme (ECO). Using the latest insulation materials, the grants cover the entire cost of having all loft rooms insulated to current building regulations. Many older properties that were originally built with loft room space or 'Room-in-Roof' were either not insulated at all or insulated using inadequate materials and techniques compared to current building regulations. By employing the latest insulation materials and methods, insulating existing attic rooms means that you can still use the roof space for storage or additional room space if needed while still trapping heat in the property and rooms below.

What defines a room in roof space?
An 'attic room' or 'room in roof' is simply defined by the presence of a fixed staircase to access the room.

Savings
Around 30% of all the heat is lost in an un-insulated room in the roof. By adequately insulating the rooms in the roof, you could save you up to £700 a year on your fuel bills.

Room in roof insulation types

There are two types of 'Room in roof' applications;

  • Loft room insulation grant - A loft room is accessed by a fixed staircase and has the whole loft area converted to a living space including the sloped eaves if the property has a pitched roof. The internal area of the room is insulated using the latest materials and techniques.
  • Attic room insulation grant - An attic room is accessed by a fixed staircase and has the eaves area of the loft squared off to create a box room in the centre. The external area surrounding the box room is insulated using the latest materials and techniques.

Find out if you qualify